How Girls Can Help Their Country; Adapted from Agnes Baden-Powell and Sir Robert Baden-Powell's Handbook. Juliette LOW, Agnes BADEN-POWELL, Sir Robert BADEN-POWELL.
How Girls Can Help Their Country; Adapted from Agnes Baden-Powell and Sir Robert Baden-Powell's Handbook
How Girls Can Help Their Country; Adapted from Agnes Baden-Powell and Sir Robert Baden-Powell's Handbook
How Girls Can Help Their Country; Adapted from Agnes Baden-Powell and Sir Robert Baden-Powell's Handbook
How Girls Can Help Their Country; Adapted from Agnes Baden-Powell and Sir Robert Baden-Powell's Handbook
How Girls Can Help Their Country; Adapted from Agnes Baden-Powell and Sir Robert Baden-Powell's Handbook

How Girls Can Help Their Country; Adapted from Agnes Baden-Powell and Sir Robert Baden-Powell's Handbook

No place listed: Juliette Low, 1916. First Edition. Stiff wraps. Cover title: How Girls Can Help Their Country, Handbook for Girl Scouts
First edition. 12mo; vi, 156pp; blue glazed cloth wrapper, line drawing of a Girl Scout in uniform to front; frontispiece and 9 additional b&w photographic illustrated plates; small b&w line drawings in text; ownership to front wrapper & ffep; Scout song in red ink to rear flyleaf; a few neat marginal notes; creasing to wrapper, a few small fore-edge closed tears, light foxing to ffep; very good. Very good. Item #1157

First edition authored by Juliette “Daisy” Low, adapted from the edition authored by Walter John Hoxie, a naturalist and friend of Juliette Low, who merged his nature girl group with the new American Girl Guides group established by Low. Hoxie adapted the British Girl Guide to the newly formed American group and it was published in 1913 by Knickerbocker Press in New York City. No mention of Hoxie is made in any of the history of the Girl Scouts of U.S.A., but can be found on the website for the Georgia Historical Society, and brief mention by Rothschild in her article, To Scout or To Guide? The Girl Scout-Boy Scout Controversy 1912-1941.

An interesting look at the lessons taught and principles of the early Girl Scouts of the United States of America. Low received push-back about the formation of the Girl Guides, as it was feared it would lead to “tom-boy” mannerisms and not domestic pursuits. Low was adamant that it was to be an organization run by women for girls and women. A two page listing of 73 “Patronesses”, with their home towns, appears after the Table of Contents. Included in the list is Mrs. Thomas Edison of Orange, N.J.

Price: $200.00

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