Proceedings of a Convention of Federal Republicans from the South Senatorial District in the County of Worcester, March 11, 1812. Benjamin HEYWOOD, Chairman, Clerk Samuel EASTMAN, Federal Party of Massachusetts.
Proceedings of a Convention of Federal Republicans from the South Senatorial District in the County of Worcester, March 11, 1812.
Proceedings of a Convention of Federal Republicans from the South Senatorial District in the County of Worcester, March 11, 1812.

Proceedings of a Convention of Federal Republicans from the South Senatorial District in the County of Worcester, March 11, 1812.

No place listed [Massachusetts]: 1812. No binding. [VOTER’S RIGHTS] [GERRYMANDERING] [GOVERNMENTAL PAMPHLET.] 8vo; 8pp; no binding, disbound leaves; text clear and easy to read; age-toning and light chipping to edges; very good plus. Very good +. Item #1272

In 1812, Elbridge Thomas Gerry (1744-1814) was Governor of the state of Massachusetts and a member of the Democratic-Republicans, the party founded by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison in 1792. Elected in 1810, during his second term in office, Gerry signed into law a controversial bill drafted by his party that created unusual redistricting to keep his political party in power. The term “gerrymandering” is named after him. Governor Gerry went on to be Vice President under James Madison in 1813 and died in office in 1814. The outrage poured onto the Democratic-Republicans in this report is real and strong for numerous changes made to governmental structures. In regard to this unusual redistricting of voting areas, the Federal Republicans argue, “They have divided towns in the most arbitrary and capricious manner, without any regard to the local convenience, and contrary to the wishes and remonstrances of a great majority of the Inhabitants, with the avowed design of increasing the strength of one political party…”
The report presents the candidacies of Bezaleel Taft and Francis Blake for the Massachusetts state senate.

Price: $200.00